FAQ

Send by emailSend by emailPDF versionPDF version

Frequently Asked Questions

 

What file formats do you accept?
What is the difference between CMYK and RGB?
What paper options are there for my job?
What is a bleed and how big does it need to be?
How do I send you my files for production?
Do I need to include my specialty font files?
What is 300 dpi and why is it important?

 

What file formats do you accept?

QuarkXPress, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, PDF, PostScript, .jpg, .svg.

Top  |  Back to Knowledge Center

 

What is the difference between the CMYK and RGB color space?

"RGB" refers to the primary colors of red, green, and blue. "CMYK" refers to the primary colors of pigment: cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. The CMYK colors are used on printing presses to make any hue possible for full color printing.

What paper options are there for my job?

We offer a wide variety of stock ranging from metallic, specialty textures and coated to uncoated sheets and everything in between. Simply describe what you're looking for and one of our sales representatives will find the right stock for you and your budget. We also have the ability to print on plastics and other non-paper based substrates.

What is a bleed and how big does it need to be?

Bleedi is the color, type or image that extends beyond the trim marks on a page. To have your color, type or image go all the way to the edge after trimming, we recommend extending the content beyond the final page size by 1/8".

So if your final page size is 8.5" x 11" and your color, type or image is full bleed (extending beyond each of the 4 edges), the file submitted for printing needs to be 8.75" x 11.25".

Top  |  Back to Knowledge Center

 

How do I send you my files for production?

You can upload your files via FTP, our custom Client WebTools, attach it to an e-mail or send us a CD or USB drive containing your content.

Top  |Back to Knowledge Center

 

Do I need to include my specialty font files?

If you send us your file as a PDF the font information will be embedded. However, if you send the file as an InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop or other editable file, you should package all your fonts and images together and send it all at once.

Why is 300dpi so important?

To achieve the sharp, bright color and image reproduction quality that only an offset press can deliver, 300 dpi images are required. Your images need to be saved at a resolution of 300 dpi in the final size that they will be used.

Some people take images from the internet when designing their print publication. These internet images are usually only 72dpi (this allows web pages to load more quickly). Use of them will result in very poor print quality. You can check an images resolution by right clicking and chosing "Properties" or by opening the image in Adobe Photoshop and opening the "Image" menu at the top and selecting "Image Size."

 

 

Back to Knowledge Center  |  Top

 

Login to your Pengad WebTools account for easy, secure file transfer.

Already a Pengad customer but don't have a WebTools account? Find out more here.

Stay informed with our E-Newsletter. The PressSheet features informative articles, design tips and much more, subscribe today!

Manage my subscriptions

Syndicate content

This is an acronym for the four process color inks used in 4-color printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Although the K commonly stands for black it does not have to. K is for "Key" plate. The Key plate holds the detail for the printed image, in 4-color printing this is usually black ink.